ORPHAN TRAIN RIDERS OF NEW YORK (MIDWEST)
Poster, January 11, 1907
NEWS  -3-
©Minneapolis (Minnesota) Journal Oct. 22, 1909
Minnesota Historical Society
©Wendinger, Renee.
 Extra! Extra! The Orphan Trains and Newsboys of New York
Minnesota: Legendary Publications, 2010, Print.

                                                                                                           CHILDREN ARE WELCOME
                                                                                  Homes for Forty-five Orphans found in Minnesota Families.

Homes have been secured for forty five orphans that are to be sent to Minnesota from New York Foundling and Orphan Asylum.  
Joseph C Butler, representing the Institution was in conference today with Rev. T.E. Cullen of the Church of the Immaculate Conception.
He said that as soon as he finds Catholic homes for sixty he will notify the New York Home and the children, attended by Sisters and nurses will  be sent .  The children are from 2
to 3 years old. Mr Butler has been in St Paul for two weeks investigating homes that the children will go into.  Most of the offers have come from the country.
©THE NEW YORK TIMES  APRIL 5, 191: pg.6
©Wendinger, Renee.  Extra! Extra! The Orphan Trains and Newsboys of New York
Minnesota: Legendary Publications, 2010, Print.

                                                                                                         FOUNDLINGS SENT WEST
                                                                         Sixty-six shipped in a Special car to Homes of Foster Parents

Sixty-six babies from the New York Foundling Hospital were shipped yesterday to foster parents in the South and West in a special car on the noon train fro St Louis from the
Grand Central Station.
The sixty-six foundlings were in charge of two Sisters of Charity and Agent O'Hara, who has been conducting the hospital's semi-annual transcontinental foundling tours for a
great many years.
When the foundlings reach St Louis they will be taken to homes in Union City, Terra Hate, Kansas City and Victoria.  The other group will be taken to Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas
and Louisiana.
The trip is the result of applications for foster children which are constantly coming into the society from charitable folk in other cities.  The homes of the applicants are thoroughly
investigated  by the agents of the hospital before the applications for the babies are granted. Prospective foster parents this year include two lawyers, two doctors, and many
farmers. The babies wear the same clothes on the trip which they wore on their admission to the hospital, and each carries this letter from Sister Teresa Vincent:

Dear Friend:
Within a week after the reception of the little one will you please fill out the enclosed slip and forward it to us.  Please write us yearly, about May 1st, how the little child is
progressing, with any items of interest.
Wishing you many blessings for your kindness to the "Orphan"
                                                                                                                                                                                               I am in our dear Lord, your respectfully,
                                                                                                                                                                                               SISTER TERESA VINCENT
                                                                                                                                                                                               The New York Foundling Hospital

Included with the slip is the blank to be filled out and returned.  It requires the name of the child received, the full name of the foster parents, the business of occupation of the
foster father, and the full Post Office address.

Remarks:Since its foundation forty-one years ago, the Foundling Hospital has provided for 52,673 infants.  Last year (1910) 500 children were placed in permanent homes with
yearly supervision lasting from fifteen to eighteen years, and 1870 deserted and 850 committed children received
©Minneapolis (Minnesota)Journal, Nov 19, 1913
Minnesota Historical Society
©Wendinger, Renee.
 Extra! Extra! The Orphan Trains and Newsboys of New York
Minnesota: Legendary Publications, 2010, Print.

                                                                                                           NEW HOMES FOR ORPHANS
                                                                   One hundred from New York Distributed in Stearns County Towns.

St Cloud, Minnesota N - One hundred orphans from a New York Asylum conducted by the Sisters of Charity, arrived here today, and will be delivered to homes which have been
provided for them.  The orphans will go to homes at Avon, Cold Springs, Holdingford,  Freeport, Lake Henry and other places.  They range in age from 1 to 4 years.
©The New York Times September 28, 1915: pg. 11.
©Wendinger, Renee.  Extra! Extra! The Orphan Trains and Newsboys of New York
Minnesota: Legendary Publications, 2010, Print.

                                                                                                   55 FOUNDLINGS SENT WEST
                                                                           Girls in Demand by those who will give them homes

Fifty-five foundlings ranging in age from one to four years, left Grand Central Terminal yesterday morning in a private carfor new homes in the West. It was the latest exodus from the
New York Foundling Hospital, on Sixty-Eighth Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues, whose agents have found homes for nearly 20,000 children in the last forty-six years.
There were forty-four girls and eleven boys, for it was explained by the Sisters of the home, girl babies are in greater demand.  The children were in the charge of four nurses and two
Sisters.  Beds for them all and food enough for one day were taken on the car.
The babies are going to homes in Minnesota and the Dakotas.  There they will grow up without knowing that they are not the own children of their foster-parents.  After three years they
may be legally adopted. The New York Foundling Hospital has about 2400 inmates, of which 800 are in the hospital and the others live in families outside(wet nurses.)

Originally published September 28, 1915